Bell Mitsubishi Blog

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Tag: Safety

Avoid those Close Encounters – How to Lessen Blind Spots by Adjusting Your Mirrors

Have you ever tried to change lanes and realized that there is a car traveling in your blind spot? Whew, that was a close one! Well, now there is an easier way to adjust your mirrors to lessen blind spots. Here are some tips:

  1. Adjust your rearview mirror so that you can clearly see out of the back of your vehicle – like you normally would.
  2. Lean your head to the left so it touches the window. Adjust the left mirror out so that the only part of your car you see is the back corner.
  3. Lean an equal distance to the right and adjust the right side mirror the same way as the left mirror.

If these adjustments are done correctly, you should now be able to see the image of a passing vehicle go directly from your rear view mirror and into a side view mirror – so the blind spots have been virtually eliminated.

Stay tuned to Bell Mitsubishi for more car tips and tricks and be sure to come visit us at Bell Mitsubishi to see our newest line of Mitsubishi models!

lessen blind spots

Google Glass Behind the Wheel: More Dangerous than We Thought?

Despite Google Glass users being able to keep their eyes on the road and having the ability to send text messages using voice transcription technology and head commands, a new study conducted at the University of Florida suggests that texting via Google Glass while driving is no safer than traditional texting and driving.

“When you look at how fast people react to an unexpected traffic event – how fast they slam on their brakes, we didn’t find a statistically significant difference between Google Glass and smartphones,” said psychological researcher Ben Sawyer at the University of Central Florida when speaking to Reuters.

Forty people took part in the study, where each participant texted about a math problem while driving using a simulator. Some participants texted with Google Glass while driving the simulator, while others used a smartphone. The simulation had a car suddenly stop in front of the drivers, forcing them to react in order to avoid a collision.

The study found that there was almost no difference in response time between the two groups. Google Glass proponents say the eyewear is safe to use while driving because the driver’s eyes never need to leave the road, but Sawyer made a good point when he said, “Looking does not necessarily mean you are seeing.”

Although this study only accounts for a very small sample of drivers, we can’t help but wonder if the same results would apply to the new technologically-advanced heads-up displays and in-car voice commands. Here at Bell Mitsubishi, we want to know what you think! Let us know if you think Google Glass behind the wheel is a safer alternative to traditional texting.